Read the STRUGGLE Online

Authors: WANDA E. BRUNSTETTER

the STRUGGLE

© 2012 by Wanda E. Brunstetter

Print ISBN 978-1-61626-089-7

eBook Editions:
Adobe Digital Edition (.epub) 978-1-60742-002-6
Kindle and MobiPocket Edition (.prc) 978-1-60742-023-1

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted for commercial purposes, except for brief quotations in printed reviews, without written permission of the publisher.

All scripture quotations are taken from the King James Version of the Bible.

All German-Dutch words are taken from the
Revised Pennsylvania German Dictionary
found in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

This book is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, and incidents are either products of the author’s imagination or used fictitiously. Any similarity to actual people, organizations, and/or events is purely coincidental.

For more information about Wanda E. Brunstetter, please access the author’s website at the following Internet address:
www.wandabrunstetter.com

Cover design: Faceout Studio,
www.faceoutstudio.com
Cover photography: Steve Gardner, Pixelworks Studios

Published by Barbour Publishing, Inc., P.O. Box 719, Uhrichsville, OH 44683,
www.barbourbooks.com

Our mission is to publish and distribute inspirational products offering exceptional value and biblical encouragement to the masses
.

Printed in the United States of America.

D
EDICATION
/A
CKNOWLEDGMENT

To Richard and Betty Miller, our dear Amish friends
who know what it’s like to deal with the adjustment
of having family members move away.

If ye forgive men their trespasses,
your heavenly Father will also forgive you
.
MATTHEW 6:14

Fisher Family Tree

Table of Contents

Chapter 1

Chapter 2

Chapter 3

Chapter 4

Chapter 5

Chapter 6

Chapter 7

Chapter 8

Chapter 9

Chapter 10

Chapter 11

Chapter 12

Chapter 13

Chapter 14

Chapter 15

Chapter 16

Chapter 17

Chapter 18

Chapter 19

Chapter 20

Chapter 21

Chapter 22

Chapter 23

Chapter 24

Chapter 25

Chapter 26

Chapter 27

Chapter 28

Chapter 29

Chapter 30

Chapter 31

Chapter 32

Chapter 33

Chapter 34

Chapter 35

Chapter 36

Chapter 37

Chapter 38

Chapter 39

Chapter 40

Chapter 41

Chapter 42

Chapter 43

Chapter 44

Chapter 45

Chapter 46

Chapter 47

Chapter 48

Chapter 49

Chapter 50

Chapter 51

Chapter 52

Chapter 53

Chapter 54

Epilogue

Discussion Questions

About the Author

C
HAPTER
1

Paradise, Pennsylvania

T
imothy Fisher approached his parents’ home with a feeling of dread. Good-byes never came easy, and knowing Mom disapproved of his decision to move to Kentucky made this good-bye even harder.

He stepped onto his parents’ porch and turned, trying to memorize the scene before him. He liked the rolling hills and rich, fertile land here in Pennsylvania. As much as he hated to admit it, he did have a few misgivings about this move. He would miss working with Dad in the fields. And just thinking about the aroma of Mom’s sticky buns made his mouth water. But it was time for a change, and Christian County, Kentucky, seemed like the place to go. After all, his twin brother, Titus, and half brother Samuel were doing quite well in Kentucky. He just hoped things would work out for him, too.

Shrugging his thoughts aside, Timothy opened the back door and stepped inside. Mom and Dad were sitting at the kitchen table, drinking coffee and eating sticky buns.

“Guder Mariye,”
he said with a smile, trying to ignore his throbbing headache.

“Mornin’.” Dad motioned to the coffeepot on the stove. “Help yourself to a cup of coffee. Oh, and don’t forget some of these,” he added, pushing the plate of sticky buns to the end of the table.

“I’ll get the coffee for you.” Mom started to rise from her seat, but Timothy shook his head.

“I can get the coffee, Mom, but I can’t stay long because I have some last-minute packing to do. Just wanted to see if there’s anything either of you needs me to do before I leave.”

Tears welled in Mom’s brown eyes. “Oh Timothy, I really wish you weren’t going. Isn’t there anything we can do to make you stay?”

Timothy poured himself a cup of coffee and took a seat at the table. “I’ve made up my mind about this, Mom. Samuel’s gotten really busy working for Allen Walters, and he’s finding a lot of paint jobs on his own, so he has enough work to hire me.”

“But you had work right here, helping your
daed
and painting for Zach.”

“I realize that, but Dad’s already hired someone else to work the fields, and Zach has other people working for him.” Timothy blew on his coffee and took a sip. “Besides, I’m not moving to Kentucky because I need a job. I’m moving to save my marriage.”

“Save your marriage?” Mom’s eyebrows furrowed. “If you ask me, taking Hannah away from her
mamm
is more likely to ruin your marriage than save it! Hannah and Sally are very close, and Hannah’s bound to resent you for separating them.”

“Calm down, Fannie.” Dad’s thick gray eyebrows pulled together as he placed his hand on Mom’s arm. “You’re gettin’ yourself all worked up, and it’s not good for your health.”

Her face flamed. “There’s nothing wrong with my health, Abraham.”


Jah
, well, you may be healthy right now, but with you gettin’ so riled about Timothy moving, your blood pressure’s likely to go up.” He gave her arm a little pat. “Besides, if he thinks it’s best for them to move to Kentucky, then we should accept that and give him our blessing.”

Mom’s chin quivered. “B–but we’ve already lost two sons to Kentucky, and if Timothy goes, too, you never can tell who might be next. At the rate things are going, our whole family will be living in Kentucky, and we’ll be here all alone.”

Timothy’s gaze went to the ceiling. “You’re exaggerating, Mom. No one else has even mentioned moving to Kentucky.”

“That’s right,” Dad agreed. “They’re all involved in their businesses, most have their own homes, and everyone seems pretty well settled right here.”

“I thought Titus and Samuel were settled, too, but they ran off to Kentucky, and now they’ve talked Timothy into moving.” Mom sniffed, and Timothy knew she was struggling not to cry.

“They didn’t talk me into moving,” Timothy said, rubbing his forehead. “I made the decision myself because I’m sick of Hannah clinging to her mamm and ignoring me.” He huffed. “I’m hoping things will be better between us once we get moved and settled into a place of our own. Hannah will need a bit of time to adjust, of course, but once she does, I’m sure she’ll see that the move was a good thing.” He smiled at Mom, hoping to reassure her. “After we get a place of our own, you and Dad can come visit us. Please, Mom, it would mean a lot to know you understand my need to do this.”

Mom sighed. “If you’re determined to go, I guess I can’t stop you, but I don’t have to like it.”

Timothy smiled when Dad gave him a wink. Mom would eventually come to grips with the move—especially when she saw how much happier he and Hannah would be. He just hoped Hannah would see that, too.